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HIV/AIDS HOTLINE: 1-800-FLA-AIDS

HIV/AIDS: Get The Facts

HIV/AIDS: Get The Facts

HIV/AIDS: GET THE FACTSWhat is HIV?

HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus. It is the virus that can lead to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, or AIDS. Unlike some other viruses, the human body cannot get rid of HIV. That means that once you have HIV, you have it for life.

No safe and effective cure currently exists, but scientists are working hard to find one, and remain hopeful. Meanwhile, with proper medical care, HIV can be controlled. Treatment for HIV is often called antiretroviral therapy or ART. It can dramatically prolong the lives of many people infected with HIV and lower their chance of infecting others. Before the introduction of ART in the mid-1990s, people with HIV could progress to AIDS in just a few years. Today, someone diagnosed with HIV and treated before the disease is far advanced can have a nearly normal life expectancy.

HIV affects specific cells of the immune system, called CD4 cells, or T cells. Over time, HIV can destroy so many of these cells that the body can’t fight off infections and disease. When this happens, HIV infection leads to AIDS.

    Where did HIV come from?
    Scientists identified a type of chimpanzee in West Africa as the source of HIV infection in humans. They believe that the chimpanzee version of the immunodeficiency virus (called simian immunodeficiency virus, or SIV) most likely was transmitted to humans and mutated into HIV when humans hunted these chimpanzees for meat and came into contact with their infected blood. Studies show that HIV may have jumped from apes to humans as far back as the late 1800s. Over decades, the virus slowly spread across Africa and later into other parts of the world. We know that the virus has existed in the United States since at least the mid- to late 1970s.

    What are the stages of HIV?
    HIV disease has a well-documented progression. Untreated, HIV is almost universally fatal because it eventually overwhelms the immune system—resulting in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). HIV treatment helps people at all stages of the disease, and treatment can slow or prevent progression from one stage to the next.

    A person can transmit HIV to others during any of these stages:

    Acute infection: Within 2 to 4 weeks after infection with HIV, you may feel sick with flu-like symptoms. This is called acute retroviral syndrome (ARS) or primary HIV infection, and it’s the body’s natural response to the HIV infection. (Not everyone develops ARS, however—and some people may have no symptoms.)

    During this period of infection, large amounts of HIV are being produced in your body. The virus uses important immune system cells called CD4 cells to make copies of itself and destroys these cells in the process. Because of this, the CD4 count can fall quickly.

    Your ability to spread HIV is highest during this stage because the amount of virus in the blood is very high.
    Eventually, your immune response will begin to bring the amount of virus in your body back down to a stable level. At this point, your CD4 count will then begin to increase, but it may not return to pre-infection levels.

    Clinical latency (inactivity or dormancy): This period is sometimes called asymptomatic HIV infection or chronic HIV infection. During this phase, HIV is still active, but reproduces at very low levels. You may not have any symptoms or get sick during this time. People who are on antiretroviral therapy (ART) may live with clinical latency for several decades. For people who are not on ART, this period can last up to a decade, but some may progress through this phase faster. It is important to remember that you are still able to transmit HIV to others during this phase even if you are treated with ART, although ART greatly reduces the risk. Toward the middle and end of this period, your viral load begins to rise and your CD4 cell count begins to drop. As this happens, you may begin to have symptoms of HIV infection as your immune system becomes too weak to protect you.

    AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome): This is the stage of infection that occurs when your immune system is badly damaged and you become vulnerable to infections and infection-related cancers called opportunistic illnesses. When the number of your CD4 cells falls below 200 cells per cubic millimeter of blood (200 cells/mm3), you are considered to have progressed to AIDS. (Normal CD4 counts are between 500 and 1,600 cells/mm3.) You can also be diagnosed with AIDS if you develop one or more opportunistic illnesses, regardless of your CD4 count. Without treatment, people who are diagnosed with AIDS typically survive about 3 years. Once someone has a dangerous opportunistic illness, life expectancy without treatment falls to about 1 year. People with AIDS need medical treatment to prevent death.


    How Can I tell if I'm infected with HIV?
    The only way to know if you are infected with HIV is to be tested. You cannot rely on symptoms to know whether you have HIV. Many people who are infected with HIV do not have any symptoms at all for 10 years or more. Some people who are infected with HIV report having flu-like symptoms (often described as “the worst flu ever”) 2 to 4 weeks after exposure. Symptoms can include:

    • Fever
    • Enlarged lymph nodes
    • Sore throat
    • Rash

    These symptoms can last anywhere from a few days to several weeks. During this time, HIV infection may not show up on an HIV test, but people who have it are highly infectious and can spread the infection to others.

    However, you should not assume you have HIV if you have any of these symptoms. Each of these symptoms can be caused by other illnesses. Again, the only way to determine whether you are infected is to be tested for HIV infection. Click here to find an HIV testing site.

    These resources are confidential. You can also ask your health care provider to give you an HIV test.

    Two types of home testing kits are available in most drugstores or pharmacies: one involves pricking your finger for a blood sample, sending the sample to a laboratory, then phoning in for results. The other involves getting a swab of fluid from your mouth, using the kit to test it, and reading the results in 20 minutes. Confidential counseling and referrals for treatment are available with both kinds of home tests.

    If you test positive for HIV, you should see your doctor as soon as possible to begin treatment.


    Is there a cure for HIV?
    For most people, the answer is no. Most reports of a cure involve HIV-infected people who needed treatment for a cancer that would have killed them otherwise. But these treatments are very risky, even life-threatening, and are used only when the HIV-infected people would have died without them. Antiretroviral therapy (ART), however, can dramatically prolong the lives of many people infected with HIV and lower their chance of infecting others. It is important that people get tested for HIV and know that they are infected early so that medical care and treatment have the greatest effect.

    Is there a link between HIV and other STDs?
    People with other more common sexually transmitted diseases (STDs),such as chlamydia, gonorrhea, genital herpes or syphilis, are at greater risk of becoming infected with HIV if they have unprotected sex with someone who is positive.

    In addition, if someone with HIV is infected with another STD, he or she is more likely to transmit the virus through sexual contact. Having another STD also can negatively affect the health of an HIV positive person. There are an estimated 19 million new STD cases occurring in the U.S. each year. As many as one in two sexually-active Americans will contract an STD by the age of 25.

    The only way to know if you have any STD, including HIV, is to ask to be tested. All STDs, including HIV, are treatable, and many other STDs are curable. Getting treated for an STD can help prevent more serious health effects and reduce the risk of contracting HIV if exposed.

    How do I reduce my risk of getting HIV?
    Condoms are a highly effective, readily available and inexpensive option for reducing the risk of contracting HIV through vaginal, anal and oral sex. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), male latex condoms when used consistently and correctly are highly effective in preventing the sexual transmission of HIV and many other STDs.

    In addition, it is also now known that an HIV positive person who is ongoing antiretroviral treatment and regular care can significantly reduce –by as much as 96%–the chances of passing the virus on to others.

    The Food and Drug Administration also recently approved the first daily antiretroviral agent for pre-exposure prophylaxis, often referred to as PrEP, for use by those who are negative to reduce the risk of contracting HIV. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, PrEP is intended to be used in combination with, not to replace, other prevention methods such as condoms. Strict adherence to the daily regimen and regular HIV testing are critical.

    HIV can also be spread by sharing needles. To find a drug treatment program near you using the hiv.gov locator. If you are using injection drugs and believe you cannot stop, reduce your risk of infection by never sharing needles, syringes or other drug preparation equipment. You can get clean needles from pharmacies or needle-exchange programs. Only use syringes that come from a reliable source.

    See more in Prevent and Protect.


    If I am HIV positive what are my options?
    Antiretroviral treatment is recommended for all people living with HIV, according to guidelines from the Department of Health and Human Services. Antiretroviral medications work to lower the levels of the virus in the bloodstream – viral load – which helps to prevent the progression of HIV to AIDS, the most advanced stage of HIV, and keep you healthier if you already have an AIDS diagnosis.

    Even if you do not feel sick or show symptoms, it’s important to consult a health care provider as soon as possible to get on treatment. In addition to benefiting your own health and well-being, people who begin medication early and take it regularly reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to sexual partners by as much as 96 percent. Also, treatment significantly reduces the likelihood of an HIV-positive pregnant woman transmitting HIV to her baby. See more in HIV/AIDS Treatment.


    Is there a vaccine or cure for HIV and/or AIDS?
    There is no vaccine to prevent HIV or a cure for those who are already infected, but there are highly effective medications– called antiretrovirals or ARVs- that help people with HIV to live long and healthy lives.

    Antiretroviral treatments work to lower the amount of HIV in the body which, when taken regularly, means better health, a longer life, and less chance of spreading the disease to others. Early diagnosis and treatment can also delay the progression of HIV to AIDS. The Department of Health and Human Services recommends anyone who is HIV positive go on antiretroviral treatment as soon as they are diagnosed.


    Are some types of sex riskier than others?
    Unprotected sex of all kinds (anal, vaginal and oral) is the most common way people get infected with HIV in the U.S. “Unprotected” means sex without barrier protection, like a condom. Remember that HIV can be present in pre-cum so pulling out early may not decrease risk. For gay and bisexual men, anal sex is the most common way HIV is transmitted.

    It is possible to get HIV and other STDs—including herpes, syphilis, gonorrhea and genital warts– during oral sex if your partner is infected, although the risk is generally lower from unprotected oral sex than from unprotected anal or vaginal sex. Still, it’s a good idea to use a barrier when giving oral sex to prevent fluids (like semen, blood, vaginal fluids) from entering your mouth. For oral sex on a penis, you should use a non-lubricated latex or polyurethane (plastic) condom.

    For oral sex on the anus (“rimming”), the risk of getting infected with HIV is lower; however, rimming may expose you to other infections, such as hepatitis or parasites. To reduce risk while rimming, use a latex barrier (like a natural rubber latex sheet, dental dam or cut-open condom that makes a square) between your mouth and your partner’s anus.


    What does it mean to have an undetectable viral load?
    An undetectable viral load means that the level of HIV present in a patient’s blood has been pushed to a very low level. Having an undetectable viral load, also referred to as being virally suppressed or having one’s virus “under control,” means better health for the HIV positive individual and also reduces the chances that he/she will pass the virus on to others. Someone who is undetectable is still HIV positive, and it is still possible for them to pass HIV on to others.

    However, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), only one in four Americans with HIV today has their virus “under control” either because they don’t know they are HIV positive or otherwise are not on treatment. As of 2012, guidelines from the Department of Health and Human Services recommend that anyone diagnosed with HIV begin treatment immediately.

    Get Tested: Know Your Status

      Who should get tested for HIV?
      HIV/AIDS: Know Your StatusThe Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends all Americans between the ages of 13-64 get tested for HIV as part of routine health care. More frequent testing is recommended for people of higher risk, including gay and bisexual men for which testing is suggested every 3 to 6 months given the higher prevalence.

      This does not mean, however, that testing is done automatically when you see a health care provider, even if you have blood drawn. Many health care providers don’t test unless you ask to be tested. The only way to know for sure if you are being tested is if you have discussed it.

      HIV testing is also recommended for all pregnant women as a part of routine prenatal care. HIV positive pregnant women can significantly reduce (by 98%) the chances of passing the virus to their unborn baby by taking certain antretroviral therapies prescribed by their doctor during pregnancy. After birth the baby may also be put on treatment for a short period to reduce the change of infection.


      How does an HIV test work?
      Most HIV tests check for antibodies that the body produces once infected with the virus. Antibodies are proteins that the immune system produces to fight off all different kinds of infections, including HIV. If an HIV test detects HIV antibodies, a person is infected with HIV.

      It can take weeks after infection for the body to develop enough antibodies to be measurable on a test. The time period between HIV exposure and a positive test is called the “window period,” during which a person could test negative for HIV but still be infected and able to transmit the virus to others. Your health care provider who provides the test can advise as to whether retesting may be recommended.


      What kinds of tests are available?
      There are several different types of HIV tests, but the two most common types are blood tests and oral swab tests. If you have a preference, ask your health care provider. A version of the oral test that can be taken at home is also now available for sale in many drug stores.

      HIV blood tests may be finger prick or a draw from the inner arm, and typically take a few weeks to get back results from the lab. Rapid oral HIV tests use a swab to collect cells from inside the mouth and may be available on site in as fast as 20 minutes.


      Is an HIV test part of my routine physical?
      Even though the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommends HIV testing as part of routine medical care, many doctors do not offer testing for HIV (or other STDs) unless you specifically ask to be tested.

      Having your blood drawn does not mean you are necessarily being tested. HIV also cannot be diagnosed with a pap smear or through a pelvic or prostate exam.

      If you don’t feel comfortable asking your health care provider to test you, there are many health clinics you can go to get tested. Many offer free or low cost testing so don’t let cost be a deterrent. And, don’t be afraid to ask questions. For local HIV testing locations in your area click here.


      How will my privacy be protected?
      HIV test results are included in your medical record and fall under the same strict privacy rules as other medical information. Information about your HIV test cannot be released without your permission. If your test shows you are infected with HIV, this information will be reported to the state health department but remains confidential and protected. A positive HIV test result is also reported to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, but without any identifying information—such as name or address–attached. CDC uses this information to keep track of HIV/AIDS in the United States and to direct funding and resources where they are needed the most. CDC does not share this information with anyone else, including insurance companies.

      At some testing locations you can get tested anonymously, meaning your name is not linked to your test results. However, anonymous testing sites are not available in all states and at all locations. You can also take an at home oral HIV test where the results are only known to you.

      If you do test positive, it is important to get into care right away. The Department of Health and Human Services recommends all HIV positive persons start antiretroviral therapy as soon as they are diagnosed, both for their own health and wellbeing as well as to help prevent the spread of the virus to others.


      How much does an HIV test cost?
      If you have health insurance, HIV testing may be covered in full. If you are paying out of pocket the cost can vary at different locations. Cost should not be a reason not to get tested. Free and/or low cost testing is available at many health centers.To find local HIV testing locations in your area click here.

      Will I be tested if I donate blood?
      When you donate blood, your blood is tested for HIV and other infections to make sure it is safe for others to receive. This kind of testing is why the blood supply of the United States and other developed countries is so safe. Any blood found to be unhealthy in some way is not used.

      However, blood donation is not a reliable or recommended way to learn your HIV status.


      What if I test positive for HIV?
      If you test positive for HIV the most important first step is to see medical doctor to get on treatment and in care, even if you don’t feel sick. The Department of Health and Human Services recommends anyone who is HIV positive go on antiretroviral treatment as soon as they are diagnosed. Antiretroviral treatments work to lower the amount of HIV in the body which, when taken regularly, means better health, a longer life, and less chance of spreading the disease to others. Early diagnosis and treatment can also delay the progression of HIV to AIDS.

      Maintaining your treatment and staying in regular medical care is a critical part of living healthy and well with HIV. Being on antiretroviral treatment also significantly reduces—by as much as 96%–the chances of passing the virus on to others.


      I tested negative, now what?

      There are more options than ever to help you stay HIV negative.

      When used correctly and consistently, condoms have been shown to be highly effective in preventing the spread of HIV, as well as many other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

      For added protection, consider PrEP (pre-exposure prophylaxis), a once-daily pill to help protect against HIV. When taken as prescribed, PrEP has been found to reduce the chance of getting HIV by more than 90 percent.

      Continue to make HIV testing a routine part of your health care. Your health care provider can advise on how often you should get tested. For those at higher risk of exposure, more frequent testing is advised, in some instances as often as every 3 to 6 months.


      Talk About HIV/AIDS

      HIV/AIDS: Talk About ItO

      pen and honest conversation about HIV/AIDS saves lives. When we talk about HIV, we help to break down the stigma around it, and we help to protect our own health and the health of those we love.

      So get talking today about sexual partners, where to get tested, stigmatism with friends and choosing if and when to disclose your status.

      • Get the Facts.
      • Get Tested.
      • Get Treatment.

      Because Broward is greater than AIDS!

        Sexual Partners
        Get personal. If there is anyone we need to talk to about HIV and other sexually transmitted disease it’s the people we have sex with, our intimate partners.

        Whether it’s about your preferred method of protection (condoms are the only option that prevent pregnancy AND disease), getting tested, or disclosing your status (or asking about theirs), find a time and place where you can have a real conversation. Where you both feel comfortable and can be open and honest with each other, and ideally before you start to have sex or at least not in the heat of the moment. See more in Disclosing Your Status below.

        Consider how you will respond if you find out he or she is HIV positive or how you will tell them if you are. When someone shares with you that they are HIV positive, recognize that it means that they trust and care about you. Listen to what they have to say. Respect their honesty. Finding out your partner is HIV positive doesn’t have to change anything. You both just need to take actions to protect one another. That means using condoms and, for the HIV positive partner, ongoing antiretroviral treatment and regular care. If you have questions, you may want to get advice from a health care professional.

        Disclosure is a highly personal issue. Finding a way to talk about our status with our sexual partners is part of being in a healthy and loving relationship.


        Health Care Providers
        Ask to be tested. Although the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommend that all Americans, ages 18-64, be tested for HIV as part of routine health care that does not mean testing is automatically done. The only way to know for sure if you are being tested for HIV is to ask to be. Having your blood drawn does not mean you are necessarily being tested. HIV also cannot be diagnosed with a pap smear or through a pelvic or prostate exam.

        If you don’t feel comfortable asking your health care provider to test you, there are many health clinics you can go to get tested. Many offer free or low cost testing so don’t let cost be a deterrent. And, don’t be afraid to ask questions. For local HIV testing locations in your area click here.

        If you are HIV positive, your provider needs to know about your status to be able to give you the best possible care, and also so that they don’t prescribe medication for you that may conflict with your HIV treatment. Connecting with a provider who you trust is the first step to getting the right care.


        Friends
        Start the conversation. By talking about HIV/AIDS, we help to confront stigma and misinformation. The more we understand the disease, how it is transmitted (and not), the less cause for fear.

        HIV has touched many lives. In the U.S. today, more than 1.1 million people are living with HIV, more than at any time in the more than 30 year history of the epidemic. National surveys indicate that half of Americans now know someone living with HIV or who has died of AIDS. By being informed and open in our conversations about HIV, it shows we care and are there for one other.

        When someone shares with you that they are HIV positive or worried they might be, the best thing you can do is listen. Disclosure is a highly personal issue. Treat it with respect. It shows that the person trusts you. If they are not already in care, the next most important step is to encourage your friend to seek medical care. Offer to go with him or her if they are anxious or reluctant. Early diagnosis and ongoing treatment are critical both in improving the health of the individual who is HIV positive as well as in preventing the spread of the virus to others. Being a good friend means looking out for each other and helping each other stay in the best possible health.


        Disclosing Your Status
        Choosing if and when to disclose your status is a personal decision. Building a support system of trusted friends and family members who know your status may help you deal with the stresses of an HIV diagnosis—you don’t have to go through this alone.

        If you feel you are not ready to disclose to people you know, or fear that they may not respond in a supportive manner, it may be helpful to find a support group in your area to speak with instead. You do not have to tell everyone in your life your status—it is your decision and you can take your time and decide what makes you feel safe and comfortable.

        Once you have decided to disclose, set up a time to talk in a private setting. Try to prepare yourself for the type of reaction they may have so that you can also prepare yourself to respond. Make a list of questions you think the person you are disclosing to might have and use the 5 ways on Greater Than AIDS to find the answers, or print out the pages and bring them with you.

        Some good points to emphasize right away if you are disclosing to family or friends are:

        • HIV is not a death sentence. With treatment it is possible to live a long and healthy life with HIV.
        • HIV is not transmitted through casual contact like holding hands, hugging and sharing drinks or utensils.
        • Express how you are feeling and what support you may need from them.

        If you are disclosing to a partner you may also want to explain:

        • He/she should get tested as well—it is important for everyone who is sexually active to know their status
        • This does not have to change the relationship. By using condoms and every time, and staying on regular treatment, couples can continue to have a normal sex life.
        • It is possible for HIV-positive parents to have an HIV-negative child. Learn more about this in Protection.

        NOTE: There are some situations where an HIV-positive person has a legal obligation to disclose his or her status. For more information, see the American Civil Liberties Union’s State Criminal Statutes on HIV Transmission. Find more information on disclosing to employers, past sexual partners and healthcare providers at The Body.

        HIV/AIDS Treatment

          Why should I get treated?
          HIV TreatmentIf you are HIV positive, an early diagnosis can make a big difference in your health outcomes. According to guidelines from the Department of Health and Human Services, antiretroviral treatment is recommended for all people living with HIV.

          Antiretroviral medications work to lower the levels of the virus in the bloodstream – viral load – which helps to prevent the progression of HIV to AIDS, the most advanced stage of HIV. Even if you do not feel sick or show symptoms, it’s important to consult a health care provider as soon as possible to get on treatment. In addition to benefiting your own health and well-being, people who take their medication regularly reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to sexual partners by as much as 96 percent. Also treatment significantly reduces the likelihood of an HIV-positive pregnant woman transmitting HIV to her baby.


          When should I start treatment?
          According to guidelines from the Department of Health and Human Services, antiretroviral treatment is recommended for all people living with HIV upon diagnosis. For people who are positive getting into and staying on treatment as soon as possible improves health, extends life and also helps prevent spreading the virus to others.

          What treatments are available for HIV?
          The U.S. Food and Drug Administration has approved many different medications for the treatment of HIV. These medications are referred to as antiretroviral therapies, or ARVs, and are available by prescription only. HIV treatments have improved significantly over the years, becoming simpler and with fewer side effects for many people. More information on treatments can be found at More information on treatments can be found at HIV.gov

          How do I know which medication is right for me?
          Different medications may work for different people so it’s important to have an ongoing and trusting relationship with a health care provider with expertise in HIV to determine the best course of treatment. Some people may be able to take newer one-pill-a-day options, while for others a treatment plan involving several different pills may work best.

          How much does HIV treatment cost?
          The cost of treatment for HIV/AIDS, like many diseases, can be expensive, but this shouldn’t be a barriers to getting care. There are options to help cover the cost. Many insurance plans cover prescription drugs, though coverage for HIV varies by plan. Medicaid, health coverage available to eligible people and families who have limited income, covers all FDA-approved prescription antiretrovirals.

          For those who do not have insurance or whose insurance does not cover HIV treatment and otherwise cannot afford treatment, the federal “AIDS Drug Assistance Program” (ADAP),”administrated by state health departments to help those with HIV access treatment, may be an option for you. Talk with your health care provider about this option, or check with the ADAP in your state to see if you are eligible. AIDS service organizations in your area can also assist with ADAP and other drug assistance options.

          Individual pharmaceutical company Patient Assistance Programs offer another avenue for financial support. In an effort to streamline the process for patients, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has partnered with seven industry partners to establish a single application form for HIV patient assistance programs. The form acts as a “one-stop shop,” allowing patients to use one form to apply for multiple patient assistance programs that together provide an entire course of antiretroviral therapy.The application can be found here.


          How long will I have to take medication?
          Once treatment is started, it is important to continue taking your medications as directed by your health care provider. Missing doses or otherwise not taking medication as prescribed may make the treatment less effective and can result in the virus becoming stronger or even resistant to future treatments.

          Many health care providers today recommend that HIV-positive patients remain on treatment even when their viral load, the amount of virus in the bloodstream, is low. Some patients get big rebounds in viral load when they stop their medication, and others develop resistance to certain medications if they aren’t taken consistently. Research has also shown people who begin medication early, and take their medication regularly, reduce the risk of transmitting HIV to a sexual partner by as much as 96 percent. Decisions about treatment should be made in consultation with your physician.


          HIV/AIDS Resources

            AIDS Healthcare Foundation

            2097 Wilton Drive
            Wilton Manors

            (954) 318-6997
            (954) 772-2411

            6405 N Federal Hwy
            Fort Lauderdale

            OUTREACH:(954) 462-9442
            (954) 522-3132
            110 SE 6th Street
            Fort Lauderdale

            AidsHealth.org

              Broward Community & Family Health Centers

              168 N Powerline RoadPompano Beach

              (954) 970-8805
              BCFHC.org

                Florida Dept. of Health in Broward County

                2421 SW 6th Ave.Fort Lauderdale

                (954) 467-4700
                BrowardCHD.org

                  Broward
                  Health

                  1101 NW 1st StreetFort Lauderdale

                  (954) 467-0880
                  (954) 772-2411

                  1111 W Broward Blvd.
                  Fort Lauderdale

                  (954) 463-7313
                  2011 NW 3rd Ave.
                  Fort Lauderdale

                  BrowardHealth.org

                    Broward
                    House

                    2800 N Andrews Ave.Wilton Manors

                    (954) 568-7373
                    501 SE 18th Court
                    Fort Lauderdale

                    (954) 566-1417
                    BrowardHouse.org</a

                      Care
                      Resource

                      871 W. OaklandPark Blvd.
                      Fort Lauderdale

                      (954) 567-7141
                      CareResource.org

                        Legal Aid Service of Broward County, Inc.

                        491 N State Road 7
                        Plantation

                        (954) 765-8950
                        LegalAid.org

                          Minority Development & Empowerment, Inc.

                          5225 NW 33rd Ave.
                          Fort Lauderdale

                          (954) 315-4530
                          MDEINC.org

                            Nova Southeastern University

                            830 E. OaklandPark Blvd.
                            Fort Lauderdale

                            Dental(954) 262-7530
                            Nova.edu

                              Poverello
                              Center, Inc.

                              2056 N Dixie Hwy.
                              Wilton Manors

                              (954) 561-3663
                              Poverello.org

                                South Broward
                                Hospital District

                                D/B/A Memorial Healthcare System

                                6730 Miramar Pkwy. Miramar

                                (954) 276-6610
                                3400 N 39th Ave.
                                Hollywood

                                (954) 965-6408
                                140 S. Federal Hwy.
                                Dania Beach

                                (954) 922-7606
                                MHS.net

                                  Children's Diagnostic And Treatment

                                  1401 S. Federal Hwy.
                                  Fort Lauderdale

                                  (954) 728-8880
                                  ChildrensDiagnostic

                                    Latinos
                                    Salud

                                    2330 Wilton Drive Wilton Manors

                                    (954) 765-6239
                                    LatinosSallud.org

                                      Pride Center
                                      At Equality Park

                                      2040 N Dixie Hwy.Wilton Manors

                                      (954) 895-6769
                                      PrideCenterFL.org

                                        T-HOUSE
                                        Digital Drop-In Center

                                        Serving the Trans-gender Community

                                        T-Houseonline.com

                                          FUSION
                                          Wilton Manors

                                          2304 NE 7th Ave. Wilton Manors

                                          (954) 630-1655
                                          Fusion

                                            HIV.GOV

                                            Learn The basics.Know The Facts.Take care of yourself.

                                            HIV.gov

                                              CDC.gov

                                              Centers forDisease Controland Prevention

                                              CDC.gov



                                              Bureau of Epidemiology

                                              Disease Reporting in Florida

                                              Florida enacted legislation in 1917 requiring the reporting of communicable diseases. As had been repeatedly remarked at the time, “No health department, State or local, can effectively prevent or control disease without knowledge of when, where, and under what conditions cases are occurring.” With this information which is gathered in an accurate and consistent manner, we can determine the kind of health interventions that are necessary to control disease and the areas where the efforts should be made.

                                              The list of reportable diseases is revised periodically and is detailed in Florida Administrative Code (F.A.C.) Chapter 64D-3. For example, a disease may be added to the list as a new pathogen emerges, or a disease may be deleted as its incidence declines. Please see the section with information for health professionals for a detailed list of diseases and conditions that are required to be reported by hospitals, physicians and laboratories.

                                               

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